Course Offerings

GET AN IN-DEPTH LOOK AT YOUR CLASSES

    • ClassDescriptionCredit
      CRJ 2520: Introduction to Criminal JusticeThis course introduces students to the criminal justice system and its three main components: law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. It reviews what constitutes a criminal offense, how crime is measured, and theories of crime causation. This course also looks at issues and challenges facing today’s criminal justice system and examines possible future directions.3
      ENG 1510: College Writing & ResearchThis course emphasizes the fundamentals of effective writing in the context of the elements of rhetoric: writer, audience, and purpose. Students write narrative, informative, and persuasive compositions and a documented research paper.3
      ENG 2510: American LiteratureAn overview of non-dramatic literature of the United States, showing its development from colonial times to the present. Students also work individually and collaboratively to explore topics, works, and authors representing multi-cultural voices in the changing canon of American literature.3
       ENG 359: Topics in English: Virtues A study of various topics in English, depending on the expertise of the professor and the interest of students. The course methodology will vary from a seminar format to a regular class format, depending on the subject and the professor.  1
      FAR 1600: Digital ImagingThis course introduces students to basic concepts and techniques of digital imagery. Students will use the principles of design and visual rhetoric in critiquing selections of digital images. Students will create a project incorporating course topics into their individual artistic expressions.  (Digital camera required)3
      HIS 1510: World CivilizationsThis course is an introductory course on selected topics in the history of major world civilizations that have shaped the foundations of mankind; from the earliest records of humankind through approximately 1500 AD. It is designed to familiarize students with the political, social, economical, religious, and intellectual histories of the world.3
      HIS 2510: American GovernmentThis course examines the politics and processes of American government at the national, state and local level: the constitutional foundations of American government; national institutions, chiefly the presidency, Congress and Supreme Court; and the political forces that shape American government, including elections, parties and interest groups.3
      IT 106: Introduction to Computer ApplicationsA “hands on” introduction to common computer software applications (including Microsoft Excel). The skills learned in this course are applicable in other business courses as well as being essential to employment opportunities.  (Chromebooks do not work due to compatibility with required software)3
       MAT 131: College Algebra This course provides a short review of Algebra II, followed by a concise study of algebraic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs. Linear, quadratic and systems of equations are included, along with their applications. This course provides a foundation for students wishing to take calculus.  (Class requires a weekly lives session: Thursdays 10:30-12:00 CST)

      Prerequisite: High School Algebra II

      MUS 235X: Music and the ArtsThis course introduces the student to music and the arts in Western Civilization. Chronologically based, the course deals with stylistic features, philosophical thought, composers, and artists and their representative works. (Also FAR 235X)3
       PED 1020: Personal Physical Fitness This course is an introduction to personal physical fitness through the practice of specific physical activity. Emphasis will be placed on exploring safe and effective methods to strengthen and improve the body’s cardiovascular and muscular systems.  Students will be able to choose their preferred physical activity, but it must be approved in advance by the instructor. Repeatable up to 3 credits if students choose different physical activities. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only.
      PHI 232: Introduction to PhilosophyA systematic approach is used in the analysis of philosophical problems. The course will examine and evaluate alternative solutions to classic philosophical issues, including the existence of God, the problem of evil, and the nature of knowledge.3
      PSY 1010: Career Exploration and PlanningThis course is designed to introduce students to the process of career exploration and planning. The first part of the course will focus on student characteristics. Students will take assessments and complete reflections to help them better understand their abilities, interests, values and personality traits and the ways that these might guide career planning. Next students will explore different pathways for pursuing careers that may be of interest to them.1
      PSY 130: General PsychologyThis course is designed to provide a broad overview of the field of psychology.  Topics include research in psychology, the brain and nervous system, sensation and perception, memory, emotion, learning, psychological disorders and psychotherapy.  This introductory course aims to help students think deliberately and skillfully about human behavior and mental processes. 3
      SCI 1531: Foundations of BiologyThis course is designed to give insight, appreciation, and understanding of the plant and animal world. Major concepts covered include cellular biology, biochemistry, photosynthesis and respiration, genetics, and embryology. Includes lab requirement.4
      SCI 2510: Nutritional ConceptsThis course provides a broad overview of basic nutrition science. Students will become familiar with: the role of nutrition in health, the principles of diet planning, the rationale for dietary standards and food labeling, and the biological functions and food sources of basic nutrients. The aim is to introduce students to the key principles of nutrition science and help them use these principles to make healthy life choices. (class runs October 20-November 21)1
      SOC 230: SociologyThis is a survey course of the basic concepts in the sociological study of society, culture, the self, social organizations, the range of associational life, and social process.3
    • ClassDescriptionCredit
      BUS 130: Concepts of Personal FinanceA practical study of what Scripture says about financial stewardship, tithing, giving, investing, and the use of debt. Students will develop personal budgets and financial goals. Discussion will also include the use of various types of credit and insurance.3
      COM 1515: Public CommunicationThis course provides the student with an introduction to the theory of the communication process. Topics include analyzing a target audience, organizing material, preparing an effective method of delivery, and developing informative and persuasive speeches. Each student will deliver speeches that are videotaped and evaluated.3
      COM 247X: Media FoundationsThis course examines the principles and processes of media creation. Special consideration will be given to montage theory as a basis for mediated messages. Students will gain a broad overview of film and video production. (Also FAR 247X)3
      ECO 332: Principles of MicroeconomicsThe continuation of ECO 331, dealing specifically with the study of microeconomics. Biblical principles and ethical implications will be addressed.  (No prerequisite required.)3
      ENG 1512: Introduction to Literary AnalysisContinued instruction and practice in writing and the writing process are the focal points of this course, with emphasis on critical analysis of literary genres.3
      ENG 359: Topics in English A study of various topics in English, depending on the expertise of the professor and the interest of students. The course methodology will vary from a seminar format to a regular class format, depending on the subject and the professor.  (Topic: Themes in Literature)
      FAR 1560: Art AppreciationAn introductory study of art appreciation that examines significant art and artists associated with major art movements with a special emphasis on historic and contemporary art reflecting Christian beliefs. Content and knowledge emerge from the study of the elements and principles of art to acquire a vocabulary and understanding of the meaning and purpose of visual imagery and an overview of the development of art throughout history to the present.3
      FAR 1600: Digital ImagingThis course introduces students to basic concepts and techniques of digital imagery. Students will use the principles of design and visual rhetoric in critiquing selections of digital images. Students will create a project incorporating course topics into their individual artistic expressions.  (Digital camera required)3
      HIS 2520: Topics in US HistoryThe course will examine political, social, economic, and international dimensions of the history of the United States. It aims to stimulate both an analytical and a moral understanding of critical issues from the nation’s past.3
      IT 204: Introduction to ProgrammingIntroduces fundamental principles of computer programming using one of the most commonly used programming languages. Students will learn programming techniques, language and vocabulary through hands on labs.  Prerequisite: IT 106

      (Programming Language – Python)

      3
      MAT 130: Math SurveyA mathematics course designed for the liberal arts or general education purposes, including quantitative literacy and mathematical competency. The course consists of problem solving and mathematical modeling. Topics include set theory, operations, percent and decimals, linear equations and their applications, slopes, parallel and perpendicular lines, systems of equations, counting techniques, probability and descriptive statistics.3
      MAT 2230: Statistical ConceptsThe basic concepts and techniques of statistical inference are introduced. Topics include frequency distribution, central tendency, probability, standardized distributions, and hypothesis testing.3
      PED 1020: Personal Physical FitnessThis course is an introduction to personal physical fitness through the practice of specific physical activity. Emphasis will be placed on exploring safe and effective methods to strengthen and improve the body’s cardiovascular and muscular systems.  Students will be able to choose their preferred physical activity, but it must be approved in advance by the instructor.  Repeatable up to 3 credits if students choose different physical activities.  Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only.1
      PED 1515: Health & Wellness for LifeThis course focuses on health in various aspects of life including physical, emotional, spiritual, vocational, social and financial health. Students will learn basic principles of health in each of these areas and be encouraged to apply these principles to their own lives.3
      PSY 130: General Psychology
      This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the field of psychology.  Topics include research in psychology, the brain and nervous system, sensation and perception, memory, emotion, learning, psychological disorders and psychotherapy.  This introductory course aims to help students think deliberately and skillfully about human behavior and mental processes.3
      SOC 2530: Introduction to Human GeographyAn introduction to physical and cultural geography by exploring pressing global issues related to spatial interconnections. Using the lens of geography, we will uncover how global interconnections and geographical interdependence shape the world as we know it. We will further understand how individual actions at the local scale have social, cultural, and religious environmental impacts around the world.3